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Rotax 582 - 25 Hour Engine Service

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I found it really hard to find information on how to do basic maintenance on the Rotax so have done a fair bit of research over the last few months. Even so, when it came to actually doing a service I found that with all my prep there were still things I did not know and I did make some mistakes. Most of this is probably fairly obvious to anyone with any engine experience but it's only obvious once you know it (if that makes sense). With that in mind I thought I would just write down what I have just done for my last 25 hour service (well, 325 to be exact) and any of the gotachas I came across. I wish I'd had this before I did my first service as I could have avoided a few pitfalls along the way.

Tools required (Exact tools I used)

- Torque Wrench (I used a 0-60NM model)
- 21mm Deep Socket
- Feeler Gauge
- Screwdriver set (I used several bits)
- Lots of rags
- Locking-Wire twisting pliers
- Standard Pliers

Consumables required (Exact ones I used)

- 4 x BR8ES Spark Plugs (897055 - Solid tip - Not screw tip)
- Gearbox oil (may be required)
- Multi-purpose Grease
- Loctite Anti-Sieze Spray
- WD40 Spray
- K&N Air Filter Cleaning / Oiling Kit (see notes below)
- 0.8mm Locking Wire

Here is the 25 hour check-list with my notes against each

Replace spark plugs

This was relatively easy. Removed the old plugs with a standard wrench. Used the feeler gauge to set the spark-gap on the new plugs and then torqued the new plugs (27nm on the 582). I somehow misread that anti-seize needs to be applied to the spark-plugs but this was incorrect. The plugs should be fitted without any lubricant according to manufacturers of the plugs and Rotax.

Something that nobody told me was that the BR8ES spark-plugs seem to come in two types. One with a solid-tip and one with a small screw-on bit on top. You are supposed to use the solid-tip ones as the screw on tip can work loose. These are only available from Rotax suppliers. The correct code is:

897055 NGK BR8ES (The 897055 bit being very important)

The gap is also slightly different on the two types. You can use a feeler gauge to reduce the gap size on the screw-tip plugs but it's not ideal. All in all just best to use the correct ones!

Check ignition system

Visually checked the ignition pathway. Ensured that the plug caps were firmly seated. Ran the engine at 3000RPM and checked both mag circuits to ensure no RPM drop over 300.

Checking of V- belt tension

Not applicable to 582

Lubricate ball joints

Used Loctite Anti Seize 8151. Sprayed and worked in to each ball-joint. For reference I had to look in the parts catalogue to find out what a "ball-joint" even was. They are the connectors used to connect the various sections of the exhaust assembly (FIGURE A. Ball Joints are marked 16 and 17).

Lubricate control cables

Lubricate with WD40 according to the P&M manual for the Quantum 15. Open and close throttles to ensure it gets in all the bits it's needed. The WD40 may vary between makes of aircraft so check your own aircraft manual if in any doubt.

Check propeller balance and tracking

I was advised that this was generally unnecessary assuming no vibration was detected during flight or on the ground. I checked for vibration during the ground run and none was detected.

Clean and oil air filter

Removed and cleaned with K&N Air Filter Cleaning spray. Required two good applications. Left to dry and re-oiled as per the oil instructions. This was attached by screwing on to the engine but it was secured with two lengths of locking wire. These I clipped and removed and then used new wire when it was re-attached. I was told that with a clean filter you should be able to see daylight through it when held up to the light.

I was advised that the filter can easily be cleaned and re-oiled in one go by washing it in 2-stroke petrol (with oil added). The petrol removes deposits and the oil re-coats the filter. I can't verify this one way or another so decided to follow the manufacturer instructions and used the official cleaner and oil.

Check fuel filter


Visually checked the filter for debris. I guess this one comes from experience but wasn't really sure what I was looking for. I have a spare fuel filter just in case but as there was nothing untoward and no debris so I did not replace it.

Check carburettor(s) and re-adjust (idle speed, cable tension, ...)


I did a visual inspection of all parts of the carb without taking it apart or removing it. Made sure things that should move, moved and things that shouldn't, didn't. I also ran the engine and made the sure the idle speed was correct and the engine idled cleanly and didn't over-rev without throttle applied.

Check gearbox oil level

Wasn't sure on this one so got a bit of help. I assumed I was looking for some kind of scale or dipstick. Nope. Simply open the middle oil level plug and see if oil comes out (FIGURE B). If it does then all is good. If it doesn't you need to put more in. It's that simple. The oil level plugs were locking wired so this needed to be undone and re-wound. I managed to do this without breaking the current wire but there is a chance you might have to redo this so best to ensure you have some 0.8mm locking wire to hand.

EDIT: It has been pointed out that according to best practice locking wire should never be reused. In aerospace circles it is classed as a consumable and new wire should be used if old wire is unwound. I think this makes a lot of sense as continual winding and unwinding of wire could cause metal fatigue and potential breakage. I was not aware of this when I did the service (and the risk is almost certainly very low) but in future I will always use new locking wire.

Anything else?

I also had a good visual inspection. Cleaned up where I had got oil marks anywhere and re-greased anything that was dirty (such as the main hang bolt).

FIGURE A - EXHAUST ASSEMBLY
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FIGURE B - GEARBOX

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Updated 24-02-15 at 11:06 AM by FlexWing-UK (Update from community)

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