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Thread: Tank sealer

  1. #1
    New Member trevor9's Avatar
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    Tank sealer

    I have a fibre glass fuel tank on my SSDR and want to ensure that it is ethanol resistant by using a pour in sealer. Any recommendations from those who have been, or are in, a similar position
    thanks


  2. #2
    Captain Dave Morton's Avatar
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    Had the same dilemma when building as not all sealants like Kreem for example are compatible with either fibreglass or plastic tanks and also the fuel lines or any other vunerable carb parts wouldn't have been protected by a tank sealer.
    In the end I decided to just use the super unleaded fuels as there was less chance of any ethanol to be present according to BP UK and would also test for ethanol (plenty of You tube videos)


  3. #3
    Co-Pilot Arielarts's Avatar
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    Be careful of sealers, they can make matters much worse by not completely adhereing and bits flaking off. Also, some are still degraded by ethanol, in spite of claims to the contrary. In my research on this, I found that some true epoxies are affected by ethanol, but polyester resins usually are not (even the LAA believe this if you look at their MOGAS approval requirements). Polyester is the cheaper option, and tank builders often use it in place of epoxy. I did a test on our glassfibre tank by gluing a temporary alloy pocket on the side and leaving 5% ethanol fuel in it (with top-ups) for several weeks. Then checking for any softening of the surface gel coat.


  4. #4
    Co-Pilot Peter Twissell's Avatar
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    I have used sealers in motorcycle tanks on several occasions over the last 10 years. I get the kits from Caswell http://www.caswelleurope.co.uk/, mainly because I was already using them for plating kits.
    So far, I have not had any problems with the tanks I have sealed. Most applications have been on older bikes, which are often parked over the winter.
    As Dave says, the sealer won't protect the fuel taps, pumps, pipes or carb, but those parts are generally easier and cheaper to replace than the tank.

    Not to be confused with sealer issues, I have seen a translucent jelly build up to the point that the fuel tap was blocked. On further investigation, I found that the jelly is in fact a bacterial growth which can occur in the water/ethanol mix which develops when the system is left undisturbed for some time. The bacteria grow all the time, but with regular use are flushed through the system. It is the excreta of the bacteria which corrodes copper and zinc based parts.
    DO NOT start adding antibiotics to your fuel...!
    G-BZNP Still not dead


  5. #5
    Co-Pilot goldrush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Twissell View Post
    ..snip..

    Not to be confused with sealer issues, I have seen a translucent jelly build up to the point that the fuel tap was blocked. On further investigation, I found that the jelly is in fact a bacterial growth which can occur in the water/ethanol mix which develops when the system is left undisturbed for some time. The bacteria grow all the time, but with regular use are flushed through the system. It is the excreta of the bacteria which corrodes copper and zinc based parts.
    DO NOT start adding antibiotics to your fuel...!

    Apologies if a bit of a thread drift, but following on from Peter's point regarding bacterial growth due to Ethanol, the following pictures from memory, were obtained from Conrad Beale and also an accident report. (the fuel colour was not due to additives/2stoke)
    Evidence appears to suggest that the growth is more prominent in glass filters than plastic ones
    They may just concentrate the mind.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by goldrush; 17-11-17 at 16:11 PM.
    Wally Hayward


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    Co-Pilot BobH's Avatar
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    Fuel filters

    There is a quick way to ensure that the bacteria doesn't clog the filters. Replace the fuel filter(s) on a regular basis, say once every 6 months. I've just bought a whole batch of plastic ones that have folded paper filters in them. They are large capacity filters, and cost something like 5 for 10. In fact I've just ordered a new batch of 20 for 8.50, and here's the link to the advert on Ebay.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/20-x-Univ...53.m2749.l2649

    It struck me that these things will stop bits of flaking fuel tube as well as anything else, but after 6 months or so it's probably best to replace them before the gunge can build up and block them. At the prices I've quoted above, it makes sense to do that rather than using expensive metal and glass filters that look pretty, but clog.


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