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  1. #21
    Co-Pilot Martin Watson's Avatar
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    It's your instructors job to be able to tell you how to develop consistency. If they can't or won't, then I agree with Roger Mole - go somewhere else and get checked out.

    In 22 years of flying I've only met one person who couldn't learn to fly and was told to give up.

    Check my PM and answer the questions - I'll have some pointers for you.

    By the way - you mention centre-line. Are you learning at an airfield with an actual centre-line painted on the runway?
    Martin
    BMAA 5370
    Fixed wing instruction, examinations and revalidations in Norfolk.


  2. #22
    Co-Pilot goldrush's Avatar
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    As others have said.. do not simply give up.

    If it gives you any comfort, many years ago when I was a BGA instructor, I had a student who simply "could not fly"... he was simply unable to co-ordinate his flying movements..... absolutely useless..... except when it was turbuent and students "should not be flying".................... then for some strange reason.... he flew and flew well!!!!
    That was the key..... so we always flew in the roughest safe conditions and slowly... slowly.. he managed to fly in normal conditions... eventually becoming an excellent pilot.

    There is "always" a key to one's difficulties and I suggest, as others have, that it would be a good idea to fly with another instructor and preferably with a CFI or examiner who may be able to spot the "key". I am somewhat surprised that your existing instructor has not arranged it already. (this being an accepted norm in many clubs)
    Wally Hayward


  3. #23
    Captain Dave Morton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Learner1 View Post
    clipped...........Apparently my circuits and general flying are ďvery goodĒ I have a tendency to have my head in the cockpit as I like to ensure the numbers are right, but have proved with all the instruments covered up I still fly well.
    Take offs are good, so we are talking landing....and the consistency. As I have said, I donít try to land when itís not right and will go round so thatís a positive,
    ........ but can I get me and the aircraft down undamaged and safely....yes!
    If you are honestly all these things then there seems to be another issue and a discussion would appear imminent (talk about your airmanship ie getting your head out of the cockpit) with the view to leaving for another instructor if a satisfactory resolution/outcome is not achieved...
    The weather is outside of your control but you have still managed to fly a lot of hours gaining extra experience, what are you practising when you fly?


  4. #24
    Captain MadamBreakneck's Avatar
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    Hi Learner1
    "Consistency, consistency!"
    - it reminds me of when I was trying to learn to fly. I'd suggest perhaps you are trying too hard and throwing hard-earned money at it. If you are not getting consistent weather, you'll struggle to work out whether it's you or the wind that's giving the problem. I'd suggest being stricter for a while about the weather conditions you fly in* so that you've taken at least one variable out of the equation. If you save your money for the good weather, you can spend it when it can deliver value in your learning. Once you've cracked the consistency problem (whatever it is) then you'll be able to take on the more exciting weather.


    Try my other suggestion from earlier too, relax and enjoy the ride - and learn to fly more by feel, just using the instruments to check every so often and at critical points. You say you've already demonstrated that you can.

    MB

    *(OK this may take some negotiation with your instructor needing to line up another student if you turn down a slot)


    Back to just bimbling


  5. #25
    Airfield Ops Grelly's Avatar
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    Just a suggestion...

    What about taking the pressure off a bit by doing a flight or two for fun. Have you got a qualified flying buddy you can do a trip with? A burger run or something. Or an hour in a tail dragger, or something aerobatic?


  6. #26
    Co-Pilot damienair's Avatar
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    This might sound really stupid. But I always found that consistency in relation to landing and to consistently always have a good landing is to try not to land. When you get set up on the centre line over the threshold just start easing back on power and slowly pull back on the yoke whilst trying as best as you can to keep the C42 just skimming down along the runway at a couple of feet off the ground. Eventually the wheels just kiss the ground.

    I flew 3-Axis for a few years but really struggled to consistently have a good landing when I was converting over to weightshifts. My takoff, circuit etc were all fine. However I really struggled when at the height of a double Decker bus to the runway. I was getting really frustrated too and felt like packing it in at the time. My instructor one day said he was going to change tactics and decided that we would spend an hour flying circuits, but not landing. First flying the circuit to 20 ft above the runway, but holding the height at 20 ft all the way down the runway. We then repeated the circuits down to 10 ft, 5ft, 2 ft and finally 1 ft, never landing. We must have flown at least 5 times down along the full lenght of the runway at 1 ft off the ground. Then the instructor said that we were going to do the same again. But this time he asked me to set up at 1 ft off the runway and slowly reduce power whilst slowly pushing out the bar, but try as best as i could not to land. We kissed the runway. Then it was back to the office for a debrief and a coffee. Then we went out again for another hour. We did 3 circuits the very same, and then the instructor stopped talking. We flew the circuits for another hour in silence. It was weird. But each landing became better than the last and consistently better. Finally he looked down following one landing and said he had to check that the wheels were turning as he could not feel the touch down. He asked me to come to a full stop. He hopped out and off I went on my own.

    Don't give up. I love flying and only fly a weightshift now. I still use the same method. I just keep the Quantum flying at 1 ft off the deck until it kisses the ground.

    Damien
    Last edited by damienair; 22-01-19 at 17:53 PM.
    Pilots are just Plane people with a special Air about them.

    G-BZJO Quantum 503 Flexwing only Jockey now.


  7. #27
    Captain MadamBreakneck's Avatar
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    I have just seen this heartening tale on the Flyer forum - it can be done

    PPL - Never. Give. Up.


    Back to just bimbling


  8. #28
    Captain kawasakiinit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by damienair View Post
    This might sound really stupid. But I always found that consistency in relation to landing and to consistently always have a good landing is to try not to land. When you get set up on the centre line over the threshold just start easing back on power and slowly pull back on the yoke whilst trying as best as you can to keep the C42 just skimming down along the runway at a couple of feet off the ground. Eventually the wheels just kiss the ground.

    I flew 3-Axis for a few years but really struggled to consistently have a good landing when I was converting over to weightshifts. My takoff, circuit etc were all fine. However I really struggled when at the height of a double Decker bus to the runway. I was getting really frustrated too and felt like packing it in at the time. My instructor one day said he was going to change tactics and decided that we would spend an hour flying circuits, but not landing. First flying the circuit to 20 ft above the runway, but holding the height at 20 ft all the way down the runway. We then repeated the circuits down to 10 ft, 5ft, 2 ft and finally 1 ft, never landing. We must have flown at least 5 times down along the full lenght of the runway at 1 ft off the ground. Then the instructor said that we were going to do the same again. But this time he asked me to set up at 1 ft off the runway and slowly reduce power whilst slowly pushing out the bar, but try as best as i could not to land. We kissed the runway. Then it was back to the office for a debrief and a coffee. Then we went out again for another hour. We did 3 circuits the very same, and then the instructor stopped talking. We flew the circuits for another hour in silence. It was weird. But each landing became better than the last and consistently better. Finally he looked down following one landing and said he had to check that the wheels were turning as he could not feel the touch down. He asked me to come to a full stop. He hopped out and off I went on my own.

    Don't give up. I love flying and only fly a weightshift now. I still use the same method. I just keep the Quantum flying at 1 ft off the deck until it kisses the ground.

    Damien



    i always kiss the ground after all my landings
    The more people I meet the more I love my cat..


  9. #29
    New Member Learner1's Avatar
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    Iíd be over the moon to qualify in 47:20.....maybe the breaks of6 months + is the answer


  10. #30
    Captain MadamBreakneck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Learner1 View Post
    Iíd be over the moon to qualify in 47:20.....maybe the breaks of 6 months + is the answer
    Quoting from linked post: "Before finally passing my skills test yesterday with 47:20 (countable) hours in the book." - my emphasis. He did more than that.

    In my own case ('Did somebody say it was easy?'), having 10 years previously been a solo glider pilot, I was microlight-solo after 15 hours but only qualified after another 50+.

    But maybe you are right. Take a break and see if you miss it.

    Either way, I hope you find what you are really looking for.


    Back to just bimbling


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