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  1. #1
    New Member ozolito's Avatar
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    make or buy a towbar for my QuikR

    Hello, can someone advise me how to make or buy a towbar for my QuikR Explorer? Thank you very much for your help.


  2. #2
    Co-Pilot Wexfordair's Avatar
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    ���� there are so many smart answers i could dream up for this!!
    But let me ask, are you making something akin to a trailer in order to tow the semi rigged aircraft behind your car? Then there would be a lot of clever engineering involved in order to lift the front wheel


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    Training Captain Gentreau's Avatar
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    If you mean a towbar for moving the trike around the hanger or airfield, I made one for my 3-axis machine a few years back from basic materials.
    The schematic below shows what I used, at the point where it says "1-2cm less... etc" I drilled a hole in the inside of each aluminium tube so that it would fit over the wheel nuts.
    All you do is spread the "legs" so they fit over the wheel nuts and then let the spring pull them together.

    Towing-bar-home-made.jpg
    The three most useless things in aviation:
    • The air above you.
    • The runway behind you.
    • The fuel in the bowser.


    Rule #1: Always tie your aircraft to the largest heaviest object available. The planet Earth meets these requirements and is readily available in all locations.
    Rule #2: The great thing about twin engined aircraft is, if one engine fails, the other engine always has just enough power to get you to the scene of the crash.

    Semper specto in clara parte vitae.

    .


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    New Member ozolito's Avatar
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    Thank you. I would need it to move the trike inside the hangar. With the case is very difficult and I also have tundra wheels


  5. #5
    New Member ozolito's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gentreau View Post
    If you mean a towbar for moving the trike around the hanger or airfield, I made one for my 3-axis machine a few years back from basic materials.
    The schematic below shows what I used, at the point where it says "1-2cm less... etc" I drilled a hole in the inside of each aluminium tube so that it would fit over the wheel nuts.
    All you do is spread the "legs" so they fit over the wheel nuts and then let the spring pull them together.

    Towing-bar-home-made.jpg
    Thank you so much for the idea. It's just something like that I'm looking for. If someone has more photos please share them


  6. #6
    Training Captain Gentreau's Avatar
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    In this photo you can see the tow-bar attached to the nose wheel.
    Hope that helps

    IMG_5119.jpg
    The three most useless things in aviation:
    • The air above you.
    • The runway behind you.
    • The fuel in the bowser.


    Rule #1: Always tie your aircraft to the largest heaviest object available. The planet Earth meets these requirements and is readily available in all locations.
    Rule #2: The great thing about twin engined aircraft is, if one engine fails, the other engine always has just enough power to get you to the scene of the crash.

    Semper specto in clara parte vitae.

    .


  7. #7
    New Member ozolito's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gentreau View Post
    In this photo you can see the tow-bar attached to the nose wheel.
    Hope that helps

    IMG_5119.jpg
    Thanks a lot! I will put pictures of mine when I make it


  8. #8
    Captain Roger Mole's Avatar
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    Before you can design/make a towbar you have to decide where/how you will attach it to the aircraft. I wouldn't be keen personally to slip a metal towbar over the wheel nuts because when you raise and lower the towbar you will be rounding the edges of the nuts.
    You also have to be careful that it can't come into contact with any other part of the airframe or engine, soft or hard, in normal use because you never hold the bar on a fixed angle while you're moving the aircraft - you're always raising and lowering it. You also want to make sure that it's attached firmly enough so you can push as well as pull - personally I wouldn't be wanting to rely solely on the 'spring' in the metal of the bar because there's a lot at stake if it can come off while in use, especially if you're pushing.
    I doubt that the one I designed and had fabricated for my Savannah would work for a Quik but it might give you a few ideas.
    My aircraft has wheel spats so the wheel nuts are covered anyway but I attached an extra thin bar across the forks above the wheel. I turned the ends of the bar down with attachment holes in them so pins in the towbar form a natural pivot.
    Each fork of the towbar is long enough to extend beyond the wheel and the fork itself is long enough to be able to set the handle of the towbar down on the ground without it fouling the wheel spat.
    There is a pin in each arm of the towbar fork to go through the holes in the crossbar. One of them is fixed and the other screws in and out. The fixed one is inserted first and then the movable one is screwed in and when the latter is fully in place it's impossible for the bar to detach whether the aircraft is being pushed or pulled.
    Like I say, I doubt that it'll work for your aircraft but it might give you a few ideas.

    sav_towbar.jpgsav_towbar2.jpg sav_towbar4.jpg sav_towbar5.jpg sav_towbar6.jpg sav_towbar7.jpg

    One final word of advice, tow bars need to be longer than you expect - see mine above. Don't make it too short. I've also got bike rubber handlebar grips on my handles as well now which make it far nicer to use.
    Last edited by Roger Mole; 13-07-19 at 15:51 PM.


  9. #9
    New Member ozolito's Avatar
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    Thanks so much for the advice! My wheel has a hole that looks like it's just right to attach a towbar. I'm going to design a bar with some rubber stops that go into the hole. I'll put some image when I finish it.

    quik_wheel.jpg


    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Mole View Post
    Before you can design/make a towbar you have to decide where/how you will attach it to the aircraft. I wouldn't be keen personally to slip a metal towbar over the wheel nuts because when you raise and lower the towbar you will be rounding the edges of the nuts.
    You also have to be careful that it can't come into contact with any other part of the airframe or engine, soft or hard, in normal use because you never hold the bar on a fixed angle while you're moving the aircraft - you're always raising and lowering it. You also want to make sure that it's attached firmly enough so you can push as well as pull - personally I wouldn't be wanting to rely solely on the 'spring' in the metal of the bar because there's a lot at stake if it can come off while in use, especially if you're pushing.
    I doubt that the one I designed and had fabricated for my Savannah would work for a Quik but it might give you a few ideas.
    My aircraft has wheel spats so the wheel nuts are covered anyway but I attached an extra thin bar across the forks above the wheel. I turned the ends of the bar down with attachment holes in them so pins in the towbar form a natural pivot.
    Each fork of the towbar is long enough to extend beyond the wheel and the fork itself is long enough to be able to set the handle of the towbar down on the ground without it fouling the wheel spat.
    There is a pin in each arm of the towbar fork to go through the holes in the crossbar. One of them is fixed and the other screws in and out. The fixed one is inserted first and then the movable one is screwed in and when the latter is fully in place it's impossible for the bar to detach whether the aircraft is being pushed or pulled.
    Like I say, I doubt that it'll work for your aircraft but it might give you a few ideas.

    sav_towbar.jpgsav_towbar2.jpg sav_towbar4.jpg sav_towbar5.jpg sav_towbar6.jpg sav_towbar7.jpg

    One final word of advice, tow bars need to be longer than you expect - see mine above. Don't make it too short. I've also got bike rubber handlebar grips on my handles as well now which make it far nicer to use.


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