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  1. #11
    Co-Pilot goldrush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gentreau View Post
    The BGA publish very useful info on field selection, although obviously aimed a glider pilots, once the engine stops... there are many similatities
    Useful video :
    https://youtu.be/-8yzREU_vdg
    Wally Hayward

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  3. #12
    Co-Pilot BobH's Avatar
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    goldrush,

    The video link you put up seems to be the introduction to a longer video that shows different field types. However, in the 4 minute video you've put a link to, the fields themselves are not described. That seems to have been put into another video, but there's no link from the introduction video to the field description video that I assume follows it.


  4. #13


  5. #14
    Co-Pilot jetlag's Avatar
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    Very interesting watching videos 2 to 8 some things evident others new to me, many good tips to finding suitable fields
    F-JRIB LF1751 Corme Ecluse

    Today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.

    Phil.


  6. #15
    Co-Pilot goldrush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobH View Post
    goldrush,

    The video link you put up seems to be the introduction to a longer video that shows different field types. However, in the 4 minute video you've put a link to, the fields themselves are not described. That seems to have been put into another video, but there's no link from the introduction video to the field description video that I assume follows it.
    "One hundered thousand humble appologies".
    Combination of:
    Old Age
    Stupidity
    Finger trouble
    complete incompetence...... and hundreds of other excuses
    Links to the Ted Lysakowsi Memorial training videos are amongst the links in the BGA members archive section

    https://members.gliding.co.uk/library/cross-country/
    Wally Hayward


  7. #16
    Co-Pilot BobH's Avatar
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    goldrush,

    I think perhaps you intended to put up a link to the complete video, which is here.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXImj2rGkf8

    The video is 47 minutes long.


  8. #17
    Co-Pilot Martin Watson's Avatar
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    Good stuff from the BGA on field selection and well worth studying.
    BUT...
    ...there are important differences between gliders flying cross country and powered aircraft suffering an engine failure. These make our priorities somewhat different.
    Bear in mind that the glider pilot knows they are likely to need a field landing. They typically fly higher than us, so that if the descend as low as 2000' they are already identifying fields. At 1000' they know where they are going to land if they need to.
    Gliders have much better glide performance so they have a bigger area of ground available to them and much more time to plan and prepare.
    An engine out forced landing in a microlight is a matter of survival. In a glider a field landing is routine.
    So yes, be aware of field selection criteria, but when it goes quiet in front remember to
    - pitch and trim for best glide speed
    - pick a field that you CAN GET TO
    - plan your approach
    Given a choice you should go for the less good field that you can reach easily with a good approach rather than the field that will be a struggle to get to and to make a good approach into.
    "A good approach into a poor field is better than a poor approach into a good field"
    Martin
    BMAA 5370
    Fixed wing instruction, examinations and revalidations in Norfolk.

  9. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Martin Watson For This Useful Post:

    Antoni (12-08-19), Gentreau (12-08-19), jetlag (12-08-19), MadamBreakneck (12-08-19), Trev C (12-08-19), unwind-protect (12-08-19)


  10. #18
    Co-Pilot Peter Twissell's Avatar
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    My forced landing experience was very similar to Bob's. The field had a young crop in, green shoots about 4" high. The soil was soft and slowed me quickly enough that I could let off the brakes to come to a halt conveniently at the edge of the field (but not in the ditch!). The landing left no visible tracks.

    The field was relatively small, but the small ruts were aligned to the wind and I could definitely get there. As it turned out, I had to side slip to avoid overshooting.
    Better to hit the far hedge or ditch at 5kts than the near one at 50kts!
    G-BZNP Still not dead

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  12. #19
    Co-Pilot BobH's Avatar
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    Peter, Martin, et al,

    I don't know about you, but I find that whether in my flexwing, or in my 3 axis aircraft, I tend to avoid flying over large areas of trees and villages wherever possible. I also try to fly over areas where the fields are a bit bigger, and I'm always on the lookout for power lines. This means I rarely fly in a direct straight line, but wander from side to side of my track in order to keep near to the most friendly looking fields, just in case!! The other thing I do is keep in mind the cone below me of available fields. This means that for instance, in my XL I had a round cone area of around 45 degrees in all directions in which I could land. In the Spectrum and the Minimax it's probably closer to 30 degrees down from the horizon, as these aircraft are a bit more slippery than the XL. However, I try to maintain the cone size of around 45 degrees for safety's sake, because that way I know I can reach the field without trying to stretch the glide.

    So far this philosophy has stood me in good stead, and whenever I've had an engine out (and I've had a few over the last 20 years) I'm not far from a possible landing field.

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  14. #20
    Wannabe Pilot Halibut's Avatar
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    Do you get many engine failures with 4 strokes?


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