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  1. #11
    Co-Pilot Halibut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Twissell View Post
    Assuming a Thruster 450 Jab at 267kg ZFW with 50 litres of fuel at 40Kg, you can have 143kg in the cockpit.
    So they can only carry two 10-and-a-half stone people?


  2. #12
    Co-Pilot Halibut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Twissell View Post
    Assuming a Thruster 450 Jab at 267kg ZFW with 50 litres of fuel at 40Kg, you can have 143kg in the cockpit.
    Quote Originally Posted by Halibut View Post
    So they can only carry two 10-and-a-half stone people?
    Sorry, brain fade: 11-and-a-quarter each


  3. #13
    Co-Pilot Halibut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halibut View Post
    Sorry, brain fade: 11-and-a-quarter each
    We’re going to need a bigger aircraft..


  4. #14
    Co-Pilot Peter Twissell's Avatar
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    Remember 143kg is total cockpit load. That includes everything that's not there at the W&B check. Your clothes, radio, gps, maps, sandwiches, drinks, - everything.
    On the other hand, it's a good motive to back away from the pies for a while.
    G-BZNP Still not dead

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  6. #15
    Training Captain Gentreau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halibut View Post
    We’re going to need a bigger aircraft..
    Or a lighter passenger ......
    The three most useless things in aviation:
    • The air above you.
    • The runway behind you.
    • The fuel in the bowser.


    Rule #1: Always tie your aircraft to the largest heaviest object available. The planet Earth meets these requirements and is readily available in all locations.
    Rule #2: The great thing about twin engined aircraft is, if one engine fails, the other engine always has just enough power to get you to the scene of the crash.

    Semper specto in clara parte vitae.

    .

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    Halibut (03-10-19), kawasakiinit (03-10-19)


  8. #16
    Co-Pilot Peter Twissell's Avatar
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    As part of the mid-life crisis, it is traditional to go for a sports car (or an overweight american motorcycle) and a young blonde. Among the variations available on that theme are an aeroplane and a partner of suitable weight, with options on hair colour.
    I have found it unnecessary to change partners, as mine won't go near the aeroplane and is happy to spend the time playing with her motorcycle.

    On a more serious note, as a relatively new pilot, I have no immediate enthusiasm for carrying passengers. If anything doesn't go to plan, there's quite enough to think about without having a passenger asking questions, or the responsibility to that passenger weighing on my mind.
    G-BZNP Still not dead


  9. #17
    Training Captain Gentreau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Twissell View Post
    ...........
    On a more serious note, as a relatively new pilot, I have no immediate enthusiasm for carrying passengers. If anything doesn't go to plan, there's quite enough to think about without having a passenger asking questions, or the responsibility to that passenger weighing on my mind.
    That's why in France you get your 'brevet' but for solo flight only.
    You then have to pass a second flight test with an instructor once you have 20~30 hours solo to get your 'emporte passager'
    The three most useless things in aviation:
    • The air above you.
    • The runway behind you.
    • The fuel in the bowser.


    Rule #1: Always tie your aircraft to the largest heaviest object available. The planet Earth meets these requirements and is readily available in all locations.
    Rule #2: The great thing about twin engined aircraft is, if one engine fails, the other engine always has just enough power to get you to the scene of the crash.

    Semper specto in clara parte vitae.

    .


  10. #18
    Captain Roger Mole's Avatar
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    Ah, whether to cross the water or not is an interesting philosophical topic that has occupied the minds of aviators for generations. There are many who say it's not for them and others who say to go for it and I respect both points of view. I'm of the latter persuasion and in a way it's made more easy for me because I don't have any dependents now and was divorced just before I came to France.

    But that doesn't mean that I have a complete disregard for the risks involved, because that certainly is not the case. However, I try to mitigate them as far as possible by ensuring that I know my aircraft well and keep it in pretty good mechanical fettle. With respect to Peter, I personally would never have a Jab engined aircraft as I believe that they are streets behind Rotax in the reliability stakes and are well-known for dumping their owners out of the air with little or no warning and at very short notice with the outcome bound to be negative if over water.

    On the other hand, if I've flown for the best part of 6 hours behind my Rotax up through France with no bad indications, I reckon that there's a pretty good chance it'll keep doing the same for the 20 minutes or so that it's over the Channel. But I admit that others have thought likewise and turned out to be wrong.

    I also felt the same when I made my first Channel crossing even though I'd only started off from Stoke and it only took me 30 or 40 minutes to get to the coast. I had full confidence in my little 503 engine that had served me without missing a beat for many hours up to then and I didn't think that there was any reason for it not to continue doing so for the 25 minutes that it was going to take to get to the other side. This proved to be the case and in fact I found myself in what I considered to be far more risky situations flying over the rocky rising ground in the Limoges area where there were few safe places to make a forced landing and the wind currents were pulling me down even when my little engine was at climbing power. I felt far less safe then than when I was crossing the Channel I guess maybe because I felt less in control of the situation.

    And maybe that's the key to it. Even when crossing the Channel I still feel as though I'm in control of what's going on. In reality I know that I've given some up and perhaps realising that is what makes other pilots unwilling to do it. However, as has been confirmed to me by recent events affecting my health (that I've been lucky to come through relatively unscathed) even when you think that you're fully in control of events, you're not and things can rise up from out of the blue and smack you in the teeth. And although I'm an old fart now (I wasn't always) I still think that an occasional frisson of excitement is life-enhancing and adds something to the spirit. I know that that could come at a great cost but I think that the risk is worth it. I fully understand that others don't.

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  12. #19
    Trainee Pilot PilotPete's Avatar
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    Although i am very much in the camp of "remain in the UK" (Brexit jokes aside please) I am quite happy stretching myself to the IOW - and although know that the previous owner of my Quantum has gone to France it still isn't for me....one element doesn't change:

    the aircraft/engine won't know its over water. as indicated expertly by Roger, the 25 minutes run time is typical running and no different to the 30 minutes engine running to get to the coast.
    the only difference is the outcome if it all goes pear shaped. I have ~120 hours sat in front of my 582 and *touching wood* has never let me down, or missed a beat so there is nothing to indicate a 25-30minute jolly across the coast would be any different.

    it isn't the aircraft or engine which is important (providing they are both mechanically sound and can cope with the 30minutes crossing*) but your willingness to take the risk if things go wrong, which are likely to start wetter than if the same occurred over land


    *it is remarkable to think Bleriot hadn't run the engine continuously to know he'd make it! while the longest single flight i have is 2hr20!


  13. #20
    Co-Pilot Peter Twissell's Avatar
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    Absolutely agree with Roger about flying over rocks, or for that matter trees or built-up areas. I'd fancy my chances a lot better in the channel than coming down in anything hard and irregular.
    G-BZNP Still not dead


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