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Thread: Jabiru 450

  1. #1
    Co-Pilot Halibut's Avatar
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    Jabiru 450

    There’s one for sale on AFORS. Just looked at the stats on Google and read that the glide ratio is 18:1. Is that right? A Cessna 150 is about 9:1.
    We've gone on holiday by mistake


  2. #2
    Captain Dave Morton's Avatar
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    Talking

    The ratios correct, plenty of gliding to be had at 18-1, downside is it prolongs the time to the inevitable impact that comes with buying jabs
    G-HAMS a pretty quick Quik


  3. #3
    Co-Pilot Martin Watson's Avatar
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    There you go, Halibut, I told you so...
    Martin
    BMAA 5370
    Fixed wing instruction, examinations and revalidations in Norfolk.


  4. #4
    Co-Pilot Halibut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Watson View Post
    There you go, Halibut, I told you so...
    Ha! You did, indeed


  5. #5
    Captain andy dixon's Avatar
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    The clue is always in the advert.....they always brag about how much they have spent on the engine in the last 12 months....and all the mods that have been done to it,like big heads and solid lifters,zero timed at a cost of 6k.ask yourself the question,would you want to spend that much money in the next 12 months ?
    disclaimer....as per 2010 European libel act....these are my thoughts only and may not represent the thoughts or actions of any person /company/group/manufacturer named in this article/Internet posting

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  7. #6
    Captain Randombloke's Avatar
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    Jabs are excellent aircraft for Jabiru experts. You get an aircraft that is very good value for money.

    If you buy one and you are not a Jab expert, you become one or you end up selling it with an ad extolling its virtues.

    The easiest way to find out is to buy it.
    Steve U.
    PG, HG & microlights
    "Weekend bimbler, day to day car driver & genuinely undeserving Southern oik who has never done anything of any worth"

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  9. #7
    Co-Pilot Peter Twissell's Avatar
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    I was on the receiving end of a few JAB jibes when I had an engine failure earlier this year.
    The reality is that my JAB dragged a Thruster around for over 1200 hours with nothing more than routine maintenance before it dropped a valve. I do not begrudge it the time and money that it is taking to rebuild.
    I will still be happier flying with a 4 stroke than relying on the momentum of hot gas as the means to wring sufficient power from a 2 stroke noise generator. But that's my personal preference and it is up to each individual to choose if they want to fly with a screaming grenade bolted to their aircraft.
    G-BZNP Still not dead


  10. #8
    Co-Pilot Antoni's Avatar
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    Reliability is acceptable with all established engines. We are taught to expect and cope with an engine failure at any moment and at all phases of flight. So why should engine reliability be such a worry?

    An engine failure should therefore only be a matter of inconvenience, some costs and a story to tell at the bar. Allowing some unreliability means CHEAP flying

    A landing approach which needs power always makes me nervous. That's why my landings at Uselby are untidy - I don't set-up to need power over those fishing lakes on short final - and so need to get rid of energy with ugly side-slips.

    Why are we not taught to always do the power-off glide landings described as the standard method in the world war two era Stick And Rudder theory book? Is it because of our lessons' design having a throw-back to teaching ab-initio to future airline pilots?

    We are flying microlights.
    "The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place" - G.B.S.

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  12. #9
    Captain Dave Morton's Avatar
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    1200 hrs is indeed good for a jab with only routine maintenance playing a part but how many engines undergo major surgery approaching that figure.
    Look in any typical hangar and you'll see plenty of rotaxs with many more hours hanging off the back of a quantum or blade all only treated with fresh oil and plugs and of course there are many school aircraft with 2-3000+ hours still starting up and sounding sweet as a nut.
    Having built a jab calypso complete with a brand new engine with all the latest improvements it was still problematic to a degree and certainly not what you would expect from a new engine (installed correctly, tomshep).
    My Quik which had only done a few hours when I bought it has just nudged 550 and I wouldn't think twice about jumping in and heading to France, that's the difference in confidence that I find with the two engines.
    Halibut doesn't seem to know what aircraft he would like and that's fine as there are many variations to choose coupled with funds available but I certainly wouldn't recommend a jabiru ul 450 unless there is somewhere he could go and learn on type and with an instructor who is very familiar on type and not just an instructor who says "yeah, I could teach you in that"
    G-HAMS a pretty quick Quik


  13. #10
    Co-Pilot Martin Watson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Morton View Post
    ...I certainly wouldn't recommend a jabiru ul 450 unless there is somewhere he could go and learn on type and with an instructor who is very familiar on type and not just an instructor who says "yeah, I could teach you in that"
    This I agree with.
    Martin
    BMAA 5370
    Fixed wing instruction, examinations and revalidations in Norfolk.


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